Ride more to save the oceans

With one of the greatest sources of micro plastic pollution in our oceans caused by car tyre dust, Cycling UK is calling on more people to leave their cars in the driveway and either cycle or walk journeys under five miles.
Research commissioned by the charity from consultancy Witteveen and Bos, has found 57% of car journeys in Great Britain are five miles or less, distances which Cycling UK says many people could easily cycle or walk.
Duncan Dollimore, Cycling UK’s head of campaigns said: “Since the UK had it’s Blue Planet moment, we’ve all accepted the need to change our plastic habits which are visible whether that’s plastic bags or excess wrapping in supermarkets.
“However, the UK has failed to address or even acknowledge one other major source of plastic: our car dependence. It’s shocking that car tyre dust is the largest source of microplastics in our oceans – more needs to be done to give people a safe and attractive alternative to driving.”
It’s shocking that car tyre dust is the largest source of microplastics in our oceans – more needs to be done to give people a safe and attractive alternative to driving.

Cycling UK is calling on the next Government to invest at least five percent of the transport budget on cycling and walking in 2020, and increasing this to at least 10 per cent by 2025.

“With 57% of car trips made in Great Britain easily feasible by bike or on foot, it’s clear the next Government must do more to limit the amounts of pollution produced by our car dependent society,” said Mr Dollimore.

“Unfortunately replacing fossil fuelled vehicles with electric cars is not going to stop the source of the microplastics in our oceans. We need better public transport options, and safer cycling and walking facilities. For cycling and walking that means rapidly increasing investment to at least 10% of the transport budget in the next five years.”

Ask your next MP to support investment of at least five percent of the transport budget on cycling and walking in 2020, and increasing this to at least 10 per cent by 2025.

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